Command-line utilities

Command-line utilities

Evaluation

Let's consider the following basic program:

program_1.uplc

(program
  2.0.0
  [ [ (builtin addInteger) (con integer 16) ] (con integer 26) ]
)

We can evaluate this program using Aiken's cli via:

$ aiken uplc eval program_1.uplc
Result
------
(con integer 42)

Costs
-----
cpu: 321577
memory: 602

Budget
------
cpu: 9999678423
memory: 13999398

The output indicates the result of the evaluation (42) as well as the execution cost of that program, both in terms of CPU and memory usage.

Note that the command also accepts arguments. So, for example, if we modify our program into a function that accepts an argument as follows:

program_2.uplc

(program
  2.0.0
  (lam x [ [ (builtin addInteger) (con integer 16) ] x ])
)

You can then instrument Aiken to provide arguments upon calling the program by simply appending them to the eval command:

$ aiken uplc eval program_2.uplc "(con integer 26)"
Result
------
(con integer 42)

Formatting

Because writing UPLC by hand can be a tedious task, Aiken provides a quick way to automatically format a UPLC program via the fmt command. By default, the command override the file given as input, but you can also simply prints the result to stdout using --print. For example:

$ aiken uplc fmt program_2.uplc --print
(program
  2.0.0
  (lam x [ [ (builtin addInteger) (con integer 16) ] x ])
)

Converting to/from binary encoding

So far, we've been representing UPLC programs using a high-level syntax. In practice, however, UPLC programs are encoded into compact binary strings when submitted on-chain (using flat (opens in a new tab)).

Aiken provides means to convert a high-level UPLC program into a low-level flat encoding − and vice-versa, via the flat and unflat commands. For example:

$ aiken uplc flat program_1.uplc --print
00000010 00000000 00000000 00110011
01110000 00001001 00000001 00000010
01000000 01101001

The --print flag instruments the command-line to print everything on stdout in a readable way. Without the flag, the command creates a file program_1.flat next to program_1.uplc.

aiken uplc flat program.uplc

and

aiken uplc flat program.uplc --out program.flat

are therefore equivalent.

From there, one can recover a UPLC high-level syntax from a flat program using unflat as such:

$ aiken uplc unflat program_1.flat --print
(program
  2.0.0
  [ [ (builtin addInteger) (con integer 16) ] (con integer 26) ]
)